Welcome to asiatradehub.com   

My ATH | Sign Up Now

Your Business To Business Portal

 

Home Asian Contents TradeHub Gallery BuySell Leads

Products Hub

China

Contents

Contents

General Detail

General Information

Economy of CHINA

Economy Overview

Economic Review

Market Overview

Economy of Hongkong 

Business Investment Tips

Investment Climate

Global Competitiveness Index

Infrastructure

Agriculture

Civil Aviation

Energy

Railways

Roads

Telecom

State Companies

Manufacturing Industry

Ports

Power

Banking

Banking

Travel

Travel

Policies

Monetary Policy

Foreign Policy

Trade

Trade

Financial Sector

Global Trade

Trade Relations

Tax Structure

Tax System

Important Contacts

Important Contacts

Investment Policies

The Chinese government has stated that it welcomes foreign investment. In particular, China seeks to promote investment in higher value-added sectors, including high technology research and development, advanced manufacturing, clean energy technology, and select modern services sectors. Export-oriented investments also often receive government support. A major goal of China's investment policies is to encourage the domestic development of technological innovation and know-how. Investment projects that involve the transfer of technology or the potential for "indigenous innovation" tend to be favorably received by China's investment authorities. Foreign investors have said they must often weigh China's market potential and its interest in attracting technology against China's inability or unwillingness to protect investors' intellectual property. 

China has indicated that it will consider restricting foreign investment in resource intensive and highly-polluting industries, citing basic manufacturing as an example. In addition, China appears to discourage foreign investments in sectors: 1) where China seeks to develop domestic firms into globally competitive multinational corporations; 2) that have benefited historically from state-authorized monopolies or from a legacy of state investment; or 3) deemed key to social stability. It also discourages investments that are intended to profit from currency, real estate, or asset speculation. 

China seeks to spread the benefits of foreign investment beyond its relatively wealthy coastal areas by encouraging foreign companies to establish regional headquarters and operations in Central, Western, and Northeastern China. China publishes and regularly revises a Catalogue of Priority Industries for Foreign Investment in the Central-Western Regions, which outlines incentives to attract investment in targeted sectors to those parts of China.

View Detail

Economy Overview

In the modern era, China's influence in the world economy was minimal until the late 1980s. At that time, economic reforms initiated after 1978 began to generate significant and steady growth in investment, consumption and standards of living. China now participates extensively in the world market and private sector companies play a major role in the economy. Since 1978 hundreds of millions have been lifted out of poverty: According to China's official statistics, the poverty rate fell from 53% in 1981 to 2.5% in 2005. However, in 2006, 10.8% of people still lived on less than $1 a day (purchasing power parity-adjusted). The infant mortality rate fell by 39.5% between 1990 and 2005, and maternal mortality by 41.1%. Access to telephones during the period rose more than 94-fold, to 57.1%.

In the 1949 revolution, China's economic system was officially made into a communist system. Since the wide-ranging reforms of the 1980s and afterwards, many scholars assert that China can be defined as one of the leading examples of state capitalism today. 

China has generally implemented reforms in a gradualist fashion. As its role in world trade has steadily grown, its importance to the international economy has also increased apace. China's foreign trade has grown faster than its GDP for the past 25 years. China's growth comes both from huge state investment in infrastructure and heavy industry and from private sector expansion in light industry instead of just exports, whose role in the economy appears to have been significantly overestimated. The smaller but highly concentrated public sector, dominated by 159 large SOEs, provided key inputs from utilities, heavy industries, and energy resources that facilitated private sector growth and drove investment, the foundation of national growth. In 2008 thousands of private companies closed down and the government announced plans to expand the public sector to take up the slack caused by the global financial crisis. In 2010, there were approximately 10 million small businesses in China. 

View Detail

Currency Converter 

this amount
enter any amount
of this type of currency

scroll down to see more currencies
into this type of currency.

scroll down to see more currencies

Feedback | Contact Us | Link Us | Site Map Press Release Terms & Conditions | Important Contacts | Tender Gallery | Sales Agreement

About Us | Advertise With Us | New Visitors | Benefits | Buy/Sell Guide | Bidding Guidelines | Astro BuzzChat | Services | Members Login

  2000- Matrix net-on-line Limited , All Rights Reserved /Disclaimer

ADVERTISE HERE